Transferring Knowledge in the Horticulture Sector

1 05 2013

Horticultural Development CompanyI’m currently one month in to a three-month full time contract as a temporary Knowledge Transfer (KT) Manager at the Horticultural Development Company (HDC), while a colleague is on a secondment to DEfRA.

HDC is a division of the Agriculture and Horticulture Development Board (AHDB), a non-departmental governnment body that collects levies from farmers and growers in the UK in order to fund research into the industry. My role as KT Manager is to translate the research produced from the field veg projects that HDC funds into meaningful outputs that provide value for money for levy payers. In plain English, this means that I help turn science into practice – something that is of course right up my street!

Things I have been working on include:

  • Editing and proofreading field vegetables research projects
  • Producing posters (like these ones on post harvest disorders of peas and beans; see below)
  • Producing factsheets to help growers make positive changes in growing practices, based on HDC-funded research – currently working on a factsheet on carrot storage, and another on farmland birds
  • Writing press releases on newsworthy research and development
  • Writing articles for the next issue of Field Vegetables Review (to be published September 2013)
  • Publicising events and field veg news in the HDC Weekly Email and on the HDC website
  • Liaising with the University of Warwick and Syngenta to promote the HDC Pest Bulletin and Pest Blog
  • Publishing the monthly Brassica Research News newsletter
  • Writing HDC Research Update articles for the British Onions Producers Associations (see below), and the Brassica Growers Associations
  • Workig with Crop Protection experts to publicise the SCEPTRE project
  • [more to be added!]

When my contract at HDC is finished, I’m really looking forward to getting involved in more knowledge transfer projects, so please contact me for a discussion on how we can help each other.

Post harvest disorders of peas

Post harvest disorders of peas – (c) Horticultural Development Company/PGRO

Post harvest disorders of beans

Post harvest disorders of beans – (c) Horticultural Development Company/PGRO

British Onions newsletter April 2013

British Onions Newsletter – (c) British Onion Producers Association

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The Science Bit: Part 7 – Oh deer! Christmas trees’ battle with Rudolph

24 12 2010

A lighthearted and seasonal Science Bit for you this month!

Ah, there’s nothing like a real Christmas tree. You can keep your plastic trees, sprayed white and gold or with fibre optic lights – for me, the annual trip to choose and collect our perfect pine tree symbolises Christmas itself and the beginning of festive few weeks of fun with friends and family.

But for some people in North America who also love the real thing, the humble Christmas tree is under threat from a very seasonal character that usually helps Santa rather than hinders him. Forests of Fraser firs in North Carolina are often frequented by deer who damage the Christmas tree crops by butting them with their antlers in order to mark their territory and by nibbling on the young shoots and buds. According to Christmas tree production specialist and agricultural researcher Jeff Owen from North Carolina State University, a single deer can munch a young Christmas tree down to the size of a pencil in no time at all.

Of course, a simple way to keep Rudolph out of the forests would be to erect good quality fencing, perhaps even electrified barriers, however with over 350 Christmas tree farms producing more than 20,000 acres of Christmas trees each year, fencing and fence maintenance is extremely expensive. An alternative is to use commercial deer repellents, but again, this can be prohibitively expensive, with 1lb of repellent costing around $18 USD, and up to 10lbs of product used per acre, two or three times a year.

Funded by the North Carolina Christmas Tree Association, Owen and his team have been researching effective deer repellents that would make a viable and cheaper alternative to the existing commercially-available products. Old wives’ tales recommend hair clippings, cayenne pepper and raw eggs to keep deer away, and it turns out that the latter of these isn’t far from the truth. The scientists discovered that a prepared mixture of dried blood and egg powder is the perfect deterrent for Bambi and friends, and can be bought very cheaply at a cost of just $2 per lb of product thanks to the fact that these are common, inedible by-products of the pet-food industry.

Owen says, “These products have an unappealing taste, but the decaying smell actually elicits a fear response in the deer and keeps them away from the crops”.  It is hoped that dried blood and powdered egg could save threatened Christmas tree stocks in North Carolina, and with the team now making headway on extending their research to see if other pet food waste products, like liver powder and fishmeal, are as effective deer repellents, tree farmers all over the States could be spoilt for choice and assured of a sustainable future. Sorry Rudolph!





More from Ecolicious Foods

14 12 2010

Just in case you missed my announcement last month that I’d recently been made chief blogger at the Ecolicious Foods blog, here’s a little update on what’s been going on with the site and the company.

Unfortunately, despite site owner Steve’s infectious enthusiasm for his organic business venture, progress with the main Ecolicious Foods website has been slow. It was hoped that the online store would go live before Christmas, but it’s looking likely that sometime in January 2011 will be a more realistic launch date.

Nevertheless, the Ecolicious blog has got off to a great start with 4 brilliant posts (I can say that; I wrote them!) including a piece about the possible link between pesticide use and the decline in the UK’s population of bees, and, in the midst of the UK government’s spending cuts, particularly in scientific research and education,  an interesting example of how a grant given by the US government is being used to fund research into organic agriculture.

The Ecolicious Foods blog is on hold now until the New Year, but we’ll be back with a vengance in 2011 to unleash Ecolicious Foods onto the world!








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